NASA Instruments On Rosetta Start Comet Science



Published on 11 June 2014


by NASA

(WireNews+Co)

Washington, D.C.

NASA Instruments On Rosetta Start Comet Science
NASA Instruments On Rosetta Start Comet Science

Three NASA science instruments aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, which is set to become the first to orbit a comet and land a probe on its nucleus, are beginning observations and sending science data back to Earth.

Launched in March 2004, Rosetta was reactivated in January 2014 after a record 957 days in hibernation. Rosetta’s objective is to arrive at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August to study the celestial object up close in unprecedented detail and prepare for landing a probe on the comet’s nucleus in November.

Above is an artist’s conception, not to scale, of Rosetta at 67P.

“We are happy to be seeing some real zeroes and ones coming down from our instruments and cannot wait to figure out what they are telling us,” said Claudia Alexander, Rosetta’s U.S. project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “Never before has a spacecraft pulled up and parked next to a comet. That is what Rosetta will do, and we are delighted to play a part in such a historic mission of exploration.”

U.S. scientists are partnering on several non-U.S. instruments and are involved in seven of the mission’s 21 instrument collaborations. NASA’s Deep Space Network is supporting ESA’s Ground Station Network for spacecraft tracking and navigation.

For more on the science mission, see this NASA press release.

 

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Posted 2014-06-11 17:05:00